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Served Three Ways: Three Covers of Bjork’s “Unravel”

April 24th, 2012

Is it just me, or is it hard to believe that Bjork has been recording music since the late 1980s? Indeed, Bjork’s first band, the Sugarcubes, released their first album in 1988. Not long thereafter (about a year after the Sucarcubes broke up), Bjork debuted her solo material in 1993. Throughout the course of her […]

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Served Three Ways: Three Covers of The Stooges’ “I Wanna Be Your Dog”

April 17th, 2012

It’s hard not to imagine a lot of head-scratching from casual rock critics when The Stooges released their debut album in 1969. Sure people had been exposed to the swagger and energy of groups like The Rolling Stones, The Troggs, The Velvet Underground; but the world wouldn’t be exposed to punk at large for a […]

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Served Three Ways: Three Covers of Radiohead’s “Exit Music (For a Film)”

April 10th, 2012

Today’s Served Three Ways is a special one for me. Radiohead have been my favorite band for over 15 years now. I’ve seen them numerous times including gigs in Oxford, England; Toronto, Canada; Cleveland Ohio; and both San Francisco & Berkeley, California (amongst other places). Tomorrow I’m heading down to San Jose with Robert from […]

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Served Three Ways: Three Covers of Sam Cooke’s “Bring It On Home To Me”

April 3rd, 2012

It’s not for nothing that Sam Cooke became known as the King of Soul. He’s widely considered one of the chief pioneers of soul music. Indeed, before his tragic death in 1964 at the age of only 33 years old, he had penned 29 separate Top 40 hits and founded a successful record label building […]

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Served Three Ways: Three Covers of Black Sabbath’s “Iron Man”

March 27th, 2012

Although Black Sabbath’s “Iron Man” has no relationship to the Marvel comic book superhero who bears the same name, the song’s protagonist shares an equally fantastic origin. The track was released in 1970 on Black Sabbath’s sophomore album Paranoid. The track received it’s theme and name when Ozzy Osbourne first heard the main guitar riff […]

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Served Three Ways: Three Covers of The Beach Boys’ “God Only Knows”

March 13th, 2012

It’s hard to believe it now, but The Beach Boys’ “God Only Knows” was originally the subject of a fair amount of hand-wringing by songwriters Brian Wilson and Tony Asher. Wilson and Asher feared that a song with the word “God” in the title would never get radio play. There was fear that it would […]

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Served Three Ways: Three Covers of Nina Simone’s “Be My Husband”

March 6th, 2012

Nina Simone’s catalog include two of the most powerful tracks ever recorded: “Feeling Good” and “Be My Husband.” The latter of the two first appeared on her 1965 album Pastel Blues. It is a completely stripped-down, bluesy affair featuring nothing more than handclaps and some subtle hi-hat to accompany her a cappella vocals. It was […]

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Served Three Ways: Three Covers of Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ “Maps”

February 27th, 2012

It’s hard to believe that the Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ debut album was released nearly 9 years ago (in April 2003). Although it’s a remarkably solid debut from start to finish, “Maps” is a notable standout demonstrating a strong (and relatively surprising) emotional foundation compared to the tracks which make up much of the rest of […]

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Served Three Ways: Three Covers of Rolling Stones’ “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction”

February 21st, 2012

The memorable three note guitar riff powering the Rolling Stones’ “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” was intended as a throwaway placeholder to be replaced with a blaring horn section. The band ultimately decided to stick with the guitar, and, according to Mick Jagger, it was that track that “changed [The Rolling Stones] from just another […]

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Served Three Ways: Three Covers of Neil Young’s “On The Beach”

February 7th, 2012

Neil Young’s On The Beach was originally released in 1974 as the follow up to the commercially and critically successful Harvest. It was raw and loose, and from the lyrics and sparse production, it’s clear that Young was in an emotionally dark place at the time. For a modern equivalent, you could compare it’s emotional […]

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